Humor

This last month ...

It's been busy! That's a good problem, right? I'm going to try to update this more often; my original goal was weekly. That was lofty at the time, but that's now the new goal. It might still be lofty...

But anyway, good things have been happening. Plus, it's been fun. Can't ask for more than that? So, what's been going on? I'll have to pick and choose, but here are the more exciting things:

Numero Uno:

Fashion,fashion, fashion 

photography

Gallery 19, Chicago, May 2017

Besides working on random projects, this has been what I have been working on most. It's kind of funny when I think about it because I haven't had much experience in the high fashion and designer department, but I have had lots in the very casual and occasional "I tried" departments.  But, I love it. I have learned A TON. Fashion photography has been suggested to me before because of the currently popular narrative/editorial aspect of it, and that is exactly what I do with 99% of my photography work; I just never considered it seriously until I was approached by a designer who was serious about having me try it out, and she was right: it's an entirely different world than the one I am used to. You know how you should practice what your preach but you usually don't? Yeah, that's what's happening.  I usually tell my high school students that they have to get out of their comfort zones or they are boring. I tell them to take risks. I've asked kids what the worst thing is that would happen if they actually raised their hands and GUESSED when giving an answer, like would they be struck by lightning? I've also made kids repeat themselves louder when they have been right and given an awesome answer, much to their embarrassment. So they will be glad to know that finally, I've definitely LEAPED out of my comfort zone (school, Woodstock, my friends, etc.) since about February, and this has been good, albeit hard for me, but it is becoming easier each time I travel to meet a stranger to talk about a shoot, am interviewed by individuals or teams of people, talk with all kinds of people who will be helping me, and doing things I never, ever imagined myself doing. I'm lucky to have a great mentor who is a designer and former professor at the SAIC, and so far, so good. And besides learning all of these new things, I have met great, great people, and that's what it's all about.

So, I've been to lots of fashion events, gone through tons of fashion magazines for inspiration, made mood boards, test shot, have done my first "real" shoot for a designer where I am the main shooter, have planned and canceled shoots, and have made tons of connections. Honestly though, I have to thank my friends. I am so lucky to have the friends I do - they have helped me with securing locations, modeling, makeup, hair, hauling crap places, laughing with me when I'm a total dork or shooting in the most awkward positions imaginable, plus lots of encouragement and other things as well.  Thank you to all of my old and new friends who have helped me out so much!  Here are some glimpses of a few happenings:

These were test shoots. Thank you Evie, Kurt, Cam, and Clara! 

Oh yeah! And I have an intern! Yep. I do. She's helped ME a ton so far, but now she's going to help me AND have her own assignments. Lucky girl. Meet Emmy, a fine arts major with a focus on printmaking and painting, from MIAD (The Milwaukee Institute of Art an Design).

What up, Emmy?! :) She's lugging stuff down from the tower at a shoot.

What up, Emmy?! :) She's lugging stuff down from the tower at a shoot.

The first shoot. This was up at Black Point Estate in Lake Geneva. Thank you Dave, for allowing us to shoot here. So grateful for Andrea and Alberto and D&A Salon and Apothecary in Woodstock, and obviously to Andrea, Patricia, and Emmy. In all, I think it went well.  Can't wait to see what I will be editing from this, but these are a few randoms from the shoot. I'm excited for the next shoot, which was supposed to be today, but I canceled it due to the probable chance of rain downtown. My idea is complicated enough … no rain allowed, so that'll be next week instead.

Numero Dos: 

Still exploring ...

and doing other stuff.

Besides all of that, and my regular life, I've still been exploring and shooting, planning for the next two Yellow Glove Shoots (cannot wait), and experimenting with different types of photography methods and art. Today I took down work at Ethereal, but will be having it displayed in three places in the upcoming week: Conscious Cup in Crystal Lake, D&A Salon and Apothecary in Woodstock, and also in the Creek Gallery Show - opening night is next Friday night, the 7th from 6-8 pm, and it's free. It is going to be a great show. I have one piece in the show itself, and was honored to be asked to display additional work in the venue room. 

Other things I've been working on and trying are lots of creative senior picture sessions, exploring new places (duh), storm chasing, continuing a b&w series focused on bodies and natural light, creating image transfers combined with encaustic art, and this process of using slide transfers to Polaroid film using a Daylab Jr., which is much harder than I imagined it would be of course, and then using the positive and negative emulsions as the centerpieces for artwork. Who knew Polaroid film is that expensive AND that they discontinued producing the 669 film a long time ago...

Also, it's been a good week for sales. A lot of people ask me what's for sale and how do they go about seeing about a piece. Well, just ask me or email me at lisabeardart@gmail.com. I will be updating this site's product page as much as possible so it's easy to see what I do have if you are  interested. Here is what sold in this past week: 

"Dangling Prayers", 11x14; "The Wedding March", w/SE Hologram, 18x24; "Muffled", 11x14; "Dirty Dishes", 11x14 "White As Snow", 11x14; "Corner Chair", 16x20, "Landline", 11x14; and "Searsboro Stool", 12x12 mixed media image transfer with acrylic

Last but not Least:

What I learned this week

by Lisa M. Beard

How to shoot fashion: look like a total dork. Because if you are worried about looking like one, you will be one, but if you look like one before you can be called one, it doesn't hurt a thing. :) Photo courtesy of Emile Reynders. Thanks for that.

Also, be very serious and if you can, wear multiple hats. Literally and figuratively.

Also, be very serious and if you can, wear multiple hats. Literally and figuratively.

The Oregon Trail, Jordan Catalano, and New Stuff

Why would I even be thinking of an 80's computer game and a cute teenage boy who was on TV in the 1990's?  You'd be surprised. It's very relevant, actually. It's something I've been thinking about and that has been brought up to me in the last week or so frequently. Maybe it's because of The Obamas exiting the White House today and Donald Trump entering it … Sorry … Or maybe it's because of a project I have been working on and trying to name, or maybe it's because of someone I met recently who understands every reference to the things I mention that are totally random to some other people. Doesn't matter. It all links up to one thing:  

I've always been interested in generations and their traits, so just a little bit about my generation: I am not a member of Generation X or a Millennial. I am a member of the microgeneration between them, a "cusper" if you will. It has a few names, the most popular being The Xennials, The Oregon Trail Generation, and The Catalano Generation. Unless you are a part of my generation, you might not even know what The Oregon Trail is or who Jordan Catalano is. What a shame.  

But the names all make sense: Xennial is a combo name, duh. The Oregon Trail was an computer game from the 80's, and my friends and I used to FIGHT over playing that game in our elementary school classroom after finishing assignments. It always sucked when your character got Typhoid Fever or Dysentry while crossing the country in a covered wagon. Another game we used to play was Where in the World Is Carmen San Diego. I was the kid who always rushed to finish my work just to play that game. This was me: "Yeah, of course I did it all carefully. YES I double-checked. Why would you ever wonder that?" Yeah right. Lying 3rd grader. I never double-checked my work.

Ohh the Commodore and the good old days. Third grade in the basement at Greenwood Elementary. There was also this great Winter Olympic game with ski jumping that we battled over playing. Good memories.

Ohh the Commodore and the good old days. Third grade in the basement at Greenwood Elementary. There was also this great Winter Olympic game with ski jumping that we battled over playing. Good memories.


Why also The Catalano Generation? Only because of arguably my favorite TV series on during the 1990's, My So Called Life, where the main male character, Jordan Catalano, was loved by girls and thought to be cool by boys because he was a stereotypically hot, lazy, but sensitive high school boy acting opposite of Claire Danes, or Angela on the show. This series was so popular with the people of my "microgeneration" that we are sometimes known as young, hot, Jared Leto's character from the show's generation. Here he is then, as Jordan Catalano, and now … which I'm definitely not complaining about either.

I have to say it's not really a bad idea for a generational name. I like The Oregon Trail idea too though. They both really do capture some important things of my youth. 


I guess this all came up because of a few things. First, I'm working on a bunch of different ideas, but one that I started awhile ago, and has been brewing for about two years has to do with the music I loved when a child, music that is on records. I have a huge collection of records, and that's because of my mom and dad who used to listen to music almost every night after dinner. I'd stare at the album art and be amazed by it. I'd also memorize the songs. This music was mostly from their generation, but some was not. Some would have been considered "current" during the early 1980's, and therefore a became big part of me. I have always hung my favorite albums up on walls as album art, but then I had this idea to remake some of my favorite covers but with some differences. The catch is these have to be albums that MEAN something to me, whether it be the artist, songs, memories associated with them, or just the damn weird album covers - one that comes to mind is the Rolling Stones album "Some Girls" where you could move their heads around to fit onto lady bodies. Most were bodies in bras that were on sale? Yeah that's what I remember.  So far, I have tried this with two albums, and it is HARD. It involves photography, of course, and it is often photography involving many models and poses the aren't easy to replicate.  I also don't want these pieces to look exactly the same as the original covers. That would be lame.  It is also involves a lot of editing and digital painting, something I am not so familiar with but now enjoy. The next step is image transfer onto a blank album cover (Thanks for that idea Riley Child, and for actually having them, Amazon) because I tried this on wood panels and it just didn't work like I wanted it to. Then I have to use oil or acrylic, charcoal, or oil pastels to finish the piece. After over 20 tries, I finally have two pieces to show for it. I think a lot of people would have quit by now, but I can't and won't.  There are a lot of ideas that I have for this, and  a lot of models lined up, so the project WILL continue.


All of this got me thinking about what generation I'm really from: Generation X, which I don't completely fit into, or the Millennials, which I feel even less connected to, because people born during about a six year age span don't really fit into either. That's where I found the information on the Xennials, or my generation, and it all makes sense. It's for real. And then I started hearing about it more, I believe because of current politics and the amount of job turnover among my friends and others; stuff like that. But then it was even brought up by a close mentor friend of mine and a few friends - this generational thing. I think I would rather be an Xennial instead of the other two generations sandwiching us because it is a pretty flexible and versatile generation. We grew up without the technology we have today, so we didn't have cell phones until our 20's, which meant we actually had to call and talk to people, including our friends' parents, to make plans. Either that or we went and knocked on a door to play. But, we were the first ones to grow up with affordable household computers, so we were exposed to technology and the awesome sound of a dial up modem for the slowest Internet speed imaginable - when we were about 16. Millennials can't even remember a time without them, and older Gen X'ers often don't understand the latest technology because of a lack of use and/or exposure. We are in the middle. Give me something and I can fumble around and always figure it out. Or don't give me anything having to do with technology and I am perfectly happy. I still WRITE OUT anything before I type it. Old school. It's kind of nice to have been able to adapt easily to technological advances but to not be addicted full on - well not me anyway.

As a teacher, I find it so funny to talk to my students about the kind of stuff. They do not remember pay phones. They do not remember calling collect. Or calling collect, leaving your name on the recording, having someone pick up and listen to it so they know to come get you, and hanging up. They never had the pleasure of knowing how to use both card catalogues and article databases. They have never used CDs OR tapes. I did until the end of college when I got my first mp3 player for running and that was like, unbelievable. So was Napster, where I got to use Eastern Illinois University's Ethernet to seriously increase my music collection. I love what it's evolved into, namely Spotify. It's great. Another thing that's nice is not having to wait at least an hour and paying a lot of money to wait for my film to be developed. My kids have no clue about that either. Or what knowing about the Gulf War was or feeling the effects of 9/11 as a 21 year old student teacher while trying to deal with the fears of my Advanced Senior English students who were 3 years younger than me when I was worried about my cousin who worked in Manhattan very close to the Twin Towers. Weird times. These kids get to use wireless everything, and soon our district will have 1:1 technology for each student; my 8 year old has his own Chromebook. I was just happy in Keyboarding I and II class with Mrs. Carroll when we used electronic typewriters and sometimes got to go to the ONE lab we had to use the awesome Apple IIe computers. They didn't even have Internet access.  Internet happened senior year in the OTHER lab, the ITC lab. I used it maybe once. And I didn't care because I didn't understand it.

This.was.hi.tech.

This.was.hi.tech.


So the album art series is not yet titled, but it will have something to do with how I feel about music and what it has to do with my membership in The Oregon Trail/Catalano/Xennial crowd. Here are a couple of my first albums - at least the photography used with them. If you know what they are, cool. If not, that's ok too. I'm just kind of messing around for now. David Bowie comes next, but that is a whole different endeavor. For this one we have the front and the back. Thank you, Kai, for including a spastic Lily on the cover.  These are just the images for transfer, so the color is obviously going to be evened out and changed. For the next, that is my son at the same age as  the boy who modeled for the real cover. Now he is the same age as when he modeled for the next, and we will be doing that soon. 


Most of the album ideas will come from the 80's or before, so I guess that's where all this generation stuff started popping into my head.  Anyway, I have also been working on some other projects. The Yellow Gloves are a given, but they aren't a focus of this post today. I have been working on a lot of other types activities with that series, but as far as working on art goes, I have really been into the albums and mixed media projects. These are two: both image transfers onto wood panels, one of a classroom at an abandoned schoolhouse in Iowa, and the other a transfer of the snow and rain on the side of a cab ride during a blizzard down Michigan Avenue in the dark on December 16th. I used some Crackle on that one. Fun.


I've also been experimenting with another idea. I won't get into the nuts and bolts of it, but it clearly involves distortion. I know that sometimes I can be a bit … let's see … realistic, not exactly dark … like some people like to say. So some of what I have been working on might reflect some of that, but it's been fun to use new programs and techniques, like Studio Artist and others, to try new things out.


Anyway, that is what my brain, my heart, and my hands have been up to. And I know that you totally appreciated this post if you knew what I was talking about, used Slap bracelets, stick on earrings, wore Hypercolor t-shirts, loved making mix-tapes, used AOL, read Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark or any Shel Silverstein collections, would break peoples' arms and cry over Cabbage Patch Kids, "smoked" candy cigarettes, loved Atari first but even more, the originall Nintendo system with Super Mario Bros. and Duck Hunt - you had to blow on the games to make them work sometimes -, watched Heathers, the Goonies, and Clueless over and over again, and wouldn't miss episodes of Dawson's Creek, the real Full House90210Saved by the Bell, or The Wonder Years. Oh yeah, and you also had to be able to attempt dancing hip hop in a circle at a school dance to "Jump Around!", "Poison", or "The Humpty Dance".  If you can rap all the words to "The Fresh Prince of Bel Air", I know you're the real deal. 

On a side note, my Etsy page is not up and running anymore. I do have some artwork for sale listed on this site, but if you want to talk about purchasing a piece of The Yellow Glove Series, please contact me using either the "Contact Me" form on this site, or email me at lisabeardart@gmail.com.

Have a good weekend everybody! Maybe go watch some Wonder Years on Netflix.

Yellow Glove Shoot #23 : Safari Bar and Kitchen

Yeah, holy crap. 23 Yellow Glove shoots. I didn't even realize it has been that many until I literally counted them a minute ago. Only 3 haven't been seen.  1 probably never will be. It didn't turn out like we thought it would. Let's just say a happy Gigi just doesn't work.

And so what if it's really 0 degrees with a -17 degree windchill and this shoot is approximately an hour north? Doesn't even matter when you really love a place and want to get one in. 

This home, which we chose mostly due to the amazing looking space and fully stocked safari-themed bar, is huge and abandoned, from what I can guess since sometime in the 1980's, is in Wisconsin, and it looks like the occupants got up and left as fast as they could … mob?? That would be the perfect story in my head. We all agree that someone need to buy this home and flip it. It could be unbelievable. Someone call Tarek and Christine. I know they're getting divorced, but supposedly they are going to keep flipping or flopping. Everything you see in the images was already in place, and there was so much more we couldn't include. 

Flip or Flop? Not their marriage silly  the house!

It was freezing, and we considered not going, but it was the only day that worked. One thing that I love about this shoot is that both models are extremely expressive, Gigi facially and her husband with body language. I think it's obvious that this guy didn't work out for her either.  She has no luck at all with men. She's like that Social Distortion Song : "Bad Luck." She's got bad, bad luck.

This is husband #6. We've had Caleb, who expects too much; Brian, who she ran from while at the altar; Riley, who was a tad bit abusive; Kai, who wanted her to cook and clean while he sat around; Alex, who was a little too perfect but made her sad; and now Ethan, who seems nice but drinks a little too much. I keep telling her she has to stop basing her choices on looks. 

Here's some of what we got during the last shoot:

I know. That bar, right?! I love the spiderweb stretching off of the bottle. And those cabinets in the kitchen! We might just have to reuse this location if it's still around in the future. Plus, looking at the models, who would even know it was colder than in the North Pole that day?  

Urban Exploring Adventure. Location: Southside of Chicago. 1.3.17

I obviously go exploring a lot, but not too often to huge factories on a planned trip with other people. Those adventures are pretty rare, but I had one on Tuesday, and it was a good one. Originally we were supposed to go on that really cold Sunday a few weeks ago, but none of us wanted to be outside for 5 hours in -14 degree real temperatures, so it was rescheduled for the 3rd. I finally got to meet Matthew (aka Steadlens) from Instagram; we have been messaging about places for a long time, and Jessi and Carolyn, two other photographers who love shooting and exploring also came with. Small groups are the best groups. Anyway, we pulled it off without a hitch (that's what good research does - thanks Matthew!) and it ended up being a great place. It  was a huge factory that used to manufacture mining locomotives but was then used to make parade floats and store them. Unfortunately, there was a recent fire, and a lot of the floats burned. Not all though. Pretty crazy. Actually, part of the intrigue for me besides the history is what gets left behind. I really don't understand it or what happens to it, and there is so much out there. This little hobby that turned into an all out obsession, and basically a second career of mine, has really opened my eyes to a lot of things I never thought about before. Another interesting part of going on "field trips" like this with other photographers is how everyone comes up with different shots of either the same thing or of things others missed. It always starts and ends the same way: we go find a way in together, walk around and ooh and ahh a bit, make sure it's an okay place to stay, and then become distracted with the things we find interesting individually. Then we usually end up on our own, and we don't even talk. It's funny. It's just about dead silent because everyone is so focused at first. For example, I was alone for about two hours by myself in there yesterday, but then we ended up finding each other in the same spot, which always happens and surprises me because usually we get there in different ways, and the buildings are huge.  So, here's some of what I came up with from yesterday's trip:

These first few are how we had to get to the property we were looking for. Much easier than expected. Just had to get to the back of the building somehow.

The next few images are what we saw as we walked closer: the place, up close to our destination, the now defunct railroad tracks that go through the entire ground floor of the building, and the only way to get in and out.

After we got in, this was where we stuck together and did the holy cow this is awesome thing! These were all taken on the first floor, before we got stuck on our individual journeys. By the way, the gears taken in these pictures were the so BIG. They were taller than me, and by a lot. 

And now for some of the rest of what I have: a combination of what I found when alone and what I took when we found each other. The only scary thing that happened to me all day was that a disgusting, small dog-sized sewer rat jumped out in front of me in the dark area you'll see. There was water in there, and that's the only time I really screamed. All I can think about is how it looked at me and about its long, gross tail. Eww. 

So that'll be it for me for awhile, as far as taking a major field trip like this. I'm wiped out, and that's because I am old and don't think or feel like I am, so I always overdo it! The next shoot will be before school starts back up, and that will be one more for the Yellow Glove Series, and I have  to say I'm really excited about it and where it will take place!

The New and Improved Website?, Abandoned Craziness, and New Projects

So, this is my new webpage. I think I like it; however, I'm curious to hear some feedback from you guys though; what do you think? Is it easy to navigate? Is it visually appealing? What can be added or improved? Seriously. Let me know. You can leave comments on this blog page, which is different from what site I used before.

Hope everybody had a great Christmas, holiday, or just a good break. I love having some extra time, and I don't go back to teaching until January 9th, so I've been working hard on a few specific things, one being my photography and art, of course. 

The first abandoned excursion that I decided take was yesterday. It's been awhile, but I had two awesome new addresses, and as many of you know, I am always scouting for new locations for shoots. As I found my first location, which looked AWESOME, by the way I noticed I'd have to drive a little ways and turn around in order to park.  I was in the middle of nowhere. As I did that, I accidentally came upon ANOTHER great abandoned house with about 6 outbuildings. I LOVE IT WHEN THAT HAPPENS. So, I stopped there first and was really pleased with what I found: lots of old coupons and pictures, so many pretty stained glass windows, and many open windows where the wind was blowing in along with gorgeous light. 

Huge barn. I have to go back. Didn't even go near it.

Huge barn. I have to go back. Didn't even go near it.

The late afternoon golden light was perfect, especially against these torn and gauzy curtains.

The late afternoon golden light was perfect, especially against these torn and gauzy curtains.

The upstairs was actually so much larger than I thought it would be.

The upstairs was actually so much larger than I thought it would be.

A view through the door of a large outhouse near the main house. This outhouse actually had a tub in it. Never seen that before. I think it is really old.

A view through the door of a large outhouse near the main house. This outhouse actually had a tub in it. Never seen that before. I think it is really old.

Now  THIS  was exciting. Do you know how long Sam and I have been looking for a real claw foot bathtub in an abandoned place that we could use for a shoot? FOREVER. This has been on our list of ideas for a long time, AND it is not really too dirty at all! 

Now THIS was exciting. Do you know how long Sam and I have been looking for a real claw foot bathtub in an abandoned place that we could use for a shoot? FOREVER. This has been on our list of ideas for a long time, AND it is not really too dirty at all! 

After a short time, I left because I wanted to go to the other two locations I had. This is where the worst part of the adventure starts. When I drove back to the next location, which was supposed to be my FIRST location, I had to figure out where to park, so I pulled off onto the side of the road. It looked fine. Yeah right. Half of my car was in grass and the other half was in about 2 feet of snow. Thanks to my huge scraper, I moved enough snow around to move my tires again, and three men who happened to be Good Samaritans in the middle of nowhere stopped and pushed me out. (THANKS!) It took over an hour, and I lost daylight. So, yes, I am going back to the other two locations this weekend, asap. The upside is that I now know where NOT to park.

Otherwise, I have been doing a lot of organizing around the house and experimenting with my art. Most people who know me understand that I love photography, but that I also like to use it to form multimedia pieces. I have so many ideas floating around in my head, so it's nice to have some time. I have about four new series ideas, and I have been continually experimenting with image transfers on many different substrates and with both oil and acrylic paint, oil pastels, graphite - you name it, I probably have tried something with it. I've only completed one major set of pieces, but that's because I started working on them in July … So here is some of the stuff I've been doing besides shooting daily. It's all unfinished, and I won't be explaining the ideas behind the work; however, here's some of the work. Some is not what I want exactly, but I'm stubborn enough to keep trying. 

This is the only set of pieces finished, and they are images from The Yellow Glove Series, all based off of one image commonly shown, "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes." These are all image transfers onto canvas paper and are embellished with some acrylic paint and thread sewn around certain parts of the image. Just an idea I had.

04.JPG
BTC 1.jpg

Here's what else I've been working on:

 

 

 

This was a photograph of the rain and snow out of the side window in a taxi I took in Chicago which has now transformed into an oil abstract from an image transfer onto wood panel.

This was a photograph of the rain and snow out of the side window in a taxi I took in Chicago which has now transformed into an oil abstract from an image transfer onto wood panel.

Mixed media piece: an image transfer from an abandoned school painted with oil and with wooden pieces added for texture onto wood panel.

Mixed media piece: an image transfer from an abandoned school painted with oil and with wooden pieces added for texture onto wood panel.

This started as a photograph of an abandoned living room from the outside looking in. It went from image transfer to oil paint and oil pastel on canvas.

This started as a photograph of an abandoned living room from the outside looking in. It went from image transfer to oil paint and oil pastel on canvas.

Hugely unfinished transfer onto wood panel for an upcoming series - if it works.

Hugely unfinished transfer onto wood panel for an upcoming series - if it works.

Another transfer and oil onto wood panel, unsanded - it will be today - and hopefully will work out as a part of the series I have stuck in my brain.

Another transfer and oil onto wood panel, unsanded - it will be today - and hopefully will work out as a part of the series I have stuck in my brain.

That's all I got; yeah it's long, but I had to try this new blog out. I'm thinking I like it.