Urbex

The Creepiest Place.

Recently many people have asked me if there are any places I’ve explored that I haven’t liked. Usually that question goes along with whether I’ve had any experiences with ghosts or supernatural activity. The answer is yes: this place.

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There haven’t been many “bad places” but this one, I hated it. It’s been gone for awhile now, and I’m pretty sure anyone else who was here with me didn’t like it much either. It was a pretty large rehab facility/rest home situated in a residential neighborhood, and even though I didn’t like it the very first time I explored it, I went back twice for Yellow Glove shoots, and it NEVER got better. Why didn’t I like it? Too may reasons to list, but here are a few: I don’t usually have the hair on my arms stand straight up, and it did here. Every. Time. My first visit I felt light-headed, and by the time I left, yep, I passed out. So many very personal belongings were left behind, and knowing people in this facility were either really ill or elderly, it made it creepy-sad. There were beeping noises. And unexplained pockets of working electricity.

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And I’d say as far as ghosts or “hauntings” go, I was a skeptic, but that changed soon after I visited this place. Maybe it’s handy that I learned how to smudge using white sage and abalone shell after I was positive something “attached” to me during my second visit, or that I now always announce my presence and intentions when exploring, even when [I think] I’m alone, or that I had to learn how to have conversations about ghosts, especially with my nanny at the time, Aubrey, who knows I am not kidding; ask her about “the rags” sometime, as well as my landlord (Real conversation: “Hey … don’t think I’m crazy, but did you HEAR that lady just knocking and yelling for help? No? Are you sure this house wasn’t built on a burial ground or something…?”). Most places have been ok. This one; not so much.

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Round Two.

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It was the creepiest, guys. There’s my answer.

Studio 204D | Starline Factory | This Friday Night - 1/26

Studio 204 D will be open during this Friday night from 6-10pm for the  new season of 4th Fridays at the Starline Factory!  

Lisa Davids, Peggy Gannon, and myself have been working on new projects, new pieces, and we are excited to have them on display.  Lisa Davids works with mixed media collage and encaustic art, Peggy works with mixed media, and I work with fine art photography, mixed media, and also have been involved with a number of other types of photography in recent months. Below is a sampling of what you will find available in our studio Friday night:

Lisa Davids: Mixed Media Collage and Encaustic Art



Peggy Gannon: Mixed Media Art



Lisa Beard: Fine Art Photography + Mixed Media


There will be more of our work posted before Friday night, so be sure to check back.  Hopefully many of you can stop by the studio and we will see you then!

This last month ...

It's been busy! That's a good problem, right? I'm going to try to update this more often; my original goal was weekly. That was lofty at the time, but that's now the new goal. It might still be lofty...

But anyway, good things have been happening. Plus, it's been fun. Can't ask for more than that? So, what's been going on? I'll have to pick and choose, but here are the more exciting things:

Numero Uno:

Fashion,fashion, fashion 

photography

Gallery 19, Chicago, May 2017

Besides working on random projects, this has been what I have been working on most. It's kind of funny when I think about it because I haven't had much experience in the high fashion and designer department, but I have had lots in the very casual and occasional "I tried" departments.  But, I love it. I have learned A TON. Fashion photography has been suggested to me before because of the currently popular narrative/editorial aspect of it, and that is exactly what I do with 99% of my photography work; I just never considered it seriously until I was approached by a designer who was serious about having me try it out, and she was right: it's an entirely different world than the one I am used to. You know how you should practice what your preach but you usually don't? Yeah, that's what's happening.  I usually tell my high school students that they have to get out of their comfort zones or they are boring. I tell them to take risks. I've asked kids what the worst thing is that would happen if they actually raised their hands and GUESSED when giving an answer, like would they be struck by lightning? I've also made kids repeat themselves louder when they have been right and given an awesome answer, much to their embarrassment. So they will be glad to know that finally, I've definitely LEAPED out of my comfort zone (school, Woodstock, my friends, etc.) since about February, and this has been good, albeit hard for me, but it is becoming easier each time I travel to meet a stranger to talk about a shoot, am interviewed by individuals or teams of people, talk with all kinds of people who will be helping me, and doing things I never, ever imagined myself doing. I'm lucky to have a great mentor who is a designer and former professor at the SAIC, and so far, so good. And besides learning all of these new things, I have met great, great people, and that's what it's all about.

So, I've been to lots of fashion events, gone through tons of fashion magazines for inspiration, made mood boards, test shot, have done my first "real" shoot for a designer where I am the main shooter, have planned and canceled shoots, and have made tons of connections. Honestly though, I have to thank my friends. I am so lucky to have the friends I do - they have helped me with securing locations, modeling, makeup, hair, hauling crap places, laughing with me when I'm a total dork or shooting in the most awkward positions imaginable, plus lots of encouragement and other things as well.  Thank you to all of my old and new friends who have helped me out so much!  Here are some glimpses of a few happenings:

These were test shoots. Thank you Evie, Kurt, Cam, and Clara! 

Oh yeah! And I have an intern! Yep. I do. She's helped ME a ton so far, but now she's going to help me AND have her own assignments. Lucky girl. Meet Emmy, a fine arts major with a focus on printmaking and painting, from MIAD (The Milwaukee Institute of Art an Design).

What up, Emmy?! :) She's lugging stuff down from the tower at a shoot.

What up, Emmy?! :) She's lugging stuff down from the tower at a shoot.

The first shoot. This was up at Black Point Estate in Lake Geneva. Thank you Dave, for allowing us to shoot here. So grateful for Andrea and Alberto and D&A Salon and Apothecary in Woodstock, and obviously to Andrea, Patricia, and Emmy. In all, I think it went well.  Can't wait to see what I will be editing from this, but these are a few randoms from the shoot. I'm excited for the next shoot, which was supposed to be today, but I canceled it due to the probable chance of rain downtown. My idea is complicated enough … no rain allowed, so that'll be next week instead.

Numero Dos: 

Still exploring ...

and doing other stuff.

Besides all of that, and my regular life, I've still been exploring and shooting, planning for the next two Yellow Glove Shoots (cannot wait), and experimenting with different types of photography methods and art. Today I took down work at Ethereal, but will be having it displayed in three places in the upcoming week: Conscious Cup in Crystal Lake, D&A Salon and Apothecary in Woodstock, and also in the Creek Gallery Show - opening night is next Friday night, the 7th from 6-8 pm, and it's free. It is going to be a great show. I have one piece in the show itself, and was honored to be asked to display additional work in the venue room. 

Other things I've been working on and trying are lots of creative senior picture sessions, exploring new places (duh), storm chasing, continuing a b&w series focused on bodies and natural light, creating image transfers combined with encaustic art, and this process of using slide transfers to Polaroid film using a Daylab Jr., which is much harder than I imagined it would be of course, and then using the positive and negative emulsions as the centerpieces for artwork. Who knew Polaroid film is that expensive AND that they discontinued producing the 669 film a long time ago...

Also, it's been a good week for sales. A lot of people ask me what's for sale and how do they go about seeing about a piece. Well, just ask me or email me at lisabeardart@gmail.com. I will be updating this site's product page as much as possible so it's easy to see what I do have if you are  interested. Here is what sold in this past week: 

"Dangling Prayers", 11x14; "The Wedding March", w/SE Hologram, 18x24; "Muffled", 11x14; "Dirty Dishes", 11x14 "White As Snow", 11x14; "Corner Chair", 16x20, "Landline", 11x14; and "Searsboro Stool", 12x12 mixed media image transfer with acrylic

Last but not Least:

What I learned this week

by Lisa M. Beard

How to shoot fashion: look like a total dork. Because if you are worried about looking like one, you will be one, but if you look like one before you can be called one, it doesn't hurt a thing. :) Photo courtesy of Emile Reynders. Thanks for that.

Also, be very serious and if you can, wear multiple hats. Literally and figuratively.

Also, be very serious and if you can, wear multiple hats. Literally and figuratively.

Abandoned Factory Tour: Acme Coke Plant, Chicago. 2.26.17

Another place I have wanted to explore for a long time crossed off the list.

Panoramic view of the ovens and coal tower with Matthew, Nate, Aubrey, and Peggy. This gives an idea of the massive size of those ovens.

At the end of last month some of my daring photographer friends and I finally made it to the South Deering neighborhood of Chicago to explore what used to be the enormous Acme Coke and Steel Plant.  Thanks Matthew, Peggy, Nate, and Aubrey for a great day.

Coking, in case you are wondering, is the baking of coal in huge ovens and turning it into a cleaner and more efficient fuel used in old huge blast furnaces. Many of these furnaces were lined up along Lake Michigan but are now demolished; according to information I found, only one is still in operation at U.S. Steel in Gary, Indiana. This area of the city was known for its steel production for most of the 20th century, and this particular plant opened in 1905. According to substreet.org, by 1909, the Acme Coke Plant spanned over 100 acres and had over 100,000 square feet of factory space.  In 2001 the factory closed for good, although it was saved for a short while in 2004 by the Calumet Heritage Partnership and provided them with enough time for them to collect historical artifacts, documents, and etc. for a museum. It was later mostly demolished, and what remains is what we got to see.

I'm sure the grounds are filled with lead, asbestos, mold,  coal (all over the place), and all other kinds of bad stuff, but seeing the grounds, going into some buildings, climbing part of the coal tower (it was way too windy to climb to the top for Nate, Matt, and me - a rare decision based on what we thought would be safe - see I'm not that crazy), seeing the ovens, finding old documents from as far back as the 1950's, and walking the grounds was interesting and worth the time and effort it took to get there. 

Proof that I was the chicken thanks to Aubrey. Yep, that's me cowering in the corner on the far right, not even standing.

First, we had to walk through some of the old buildings. It's crazy what is left behind. So many boots, hard hats, pairs of goggles, gloves and other items workers had used.

As we walked towards the coal tower and the coke ovens, which were what I really wanted to see, we saw what a wasteland the property had become.  We saw trash, of course, but also clothes, boots, a burned up truck, and half-standing buildings.

From previously seen pictures, I pictured the ovens and tower as taking up some space but not really tall and huge, like they were. The first set of ovens reminded me of tall ancient Roman ruins, except instead of white they were burned into colorful brick. The second set of ovens looked were shorter, but just as colorful. And even though it was a bright, sunny day, it was very cold and windy, so windy that it took me a good ten minutes to stand up on a platform  to look out over the grounds after climbing partially up the coal tower. Getting up there was hard enough - stepping on beams and sliding up through narrow slats until making it to the platform, but the wind was almost too much. I was afraid  to put my camera bag down. We found the yellow outer stairway leading to the very top of the tower, but Matthew, Nate, and I unfortunately and rarely decided it was too dangerous to climb to the top. See. I'm not as crazy as you think. Getting to the platform was good enough. 

Interesting, worth it, another good place to explore and photograph, and another part of history that could soon be forgotten. Thanks for a good day you guys, and thanks for the logistics, Matthew! 

 

Aubrey, Peggy, Nate, and Matthew around some of the grounds.

For more information on this factory, there are a bunch of places to check out, but here are a couple of good ones.

http://substreet.org/acme-coke/
http://www.idaillinois.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/pshs02

Urban Exploring Adventure. Location: Southside of Chicago. 1.3.17

I obviously go exploring a lot, but not too often to huge factories on a planned trip with other people. Those adventures are pretty rare, but I had one on Tuesday, and it was a good one. Originally we were supposed to go on that really cold Sunday a few weeks ago, but none of us wanted to be outside for 5 hours in -14 degree real temperatures, so it was rescheduled for the 3rd. I finally got to meet Matthew (aka Steadlens) from Instagram; we have been messaging about places for a long time, and Jessi and Carolyn, two other photographers who love shooting and exploring also came with. Small groups are the best groups. Anyway, we pulled it off without a hitch (that's what good research does - thanks Matthew!) and it ended up being a great place. It  was a huge factory that used to manufacture mining locomotives but was then used to make parade floats and store them. Unfortunately, there was a recent fire, and a lot of the floats burned. Not all though. Pretty crazy. Actually, part of the intrigue for me besides the history is what gets left behind. I really don't understand it or what happens to it, and there is so much out there. This little hobby that turned into an all out obsession, and basically a second career of mine, has really opened my eyes to a lot of things I never thought about before. Another interesting part of going on "field trips" like this with other photographers is how everyone comes up with different shots of either the same thing or of things others missed. It always starts and ends the same way: we go find a way in together, walk around and ooh and ahh a bit, make sure it's an okay place to stay, and then become distracted with the things we find interesting individually. Then we usually end up on our own, and we don't even talk. It's funny. It's just about dead silent because everyone is so focused at first. For example, I was alone for about two hours by myself in there yesterday, but then we ended up finding each other in the same spot, which always happens and surprises me because usually we get there in different ways, and the buildings are huge.  So, here's some of what I came up with from yesterday's trip:

These first few are how we had to get to the property we were looking for. Much easier than expected. Just had to get to the back of the building somehow.

The next few images are what we saw as we walked closer: the place, up close to our destination, the now defunct railroad tracks that go through the entire ground floor of the building, and the only way to get in and out.

After we got in, this was where we stuck together and did the holy cow this is awesome thing! These were all taken on the first floor, before we got stuck on our individual journeys. By the way, the gears taken in these pictures were the so BIG. They were taller than me, and by a lot. 

And now for some of the rest of what I have: a combination of what I found when alone and what I took when we found each other. The only scary thing that happened to me all day was that a disgusting, small dog-sized sewer rat jumped out in front of me in the dark area you'll see. There was water in there, and that's the only time I really screamed. All I can think about is how it looked at me and about its long, gross tail. Eww. 

So that'll be it for me for awhile, as far as taking a major field trip like this. I'm wiped out, and that's because I am old and don't think or feel like I am, so I always overdo it! The next shoot will be before school starts back up, and that will be one more for the Yellow Glove Series, and I have  to say I'm really excited about it and where it will take place!

Abandoned House & Factory Tours

For some of us, finding an abandoned house or factory is crazy exciting and only happens every once in a long while. This weekend was a rare one for me - I had two new addresses to go to from an Instagram swap, but while on those trips, I found an accidental house that was great and with three other friends, accidentally found a huge factory. So I have to post some pictures. One house was basically in shambles but still good, one house was very old and cool with historical items laying around, and one house was just plain weird. I would almost consider it a mansion. SO MANY things were left behind, and not from today; I'm thinking 80's based on the cassette tapes I found (lots of hair bands, Maria Lyons). And the factory: it was huge, filled with graffiti, and had a lot of cool and safe :) places to climb.  So for me, yeah, basically what started as a boring weekend turned out to be a really good one.

Here are are some images I captured; I'll go in the order visited. This first place was the one I discovered by accident; it was very old and had many great things just laying around. Many windows also contained some kind of beautiful stained glass.

The second house I went to was less than a mile away and was also very, very old. It was half destroyed and not easy to maneuver through, but what was left inside was great: just old rooms and hideous wallpaper and LOTS of old-fashioned lights. It also had about six outbuildings and many contained rusty bikes?!

The final house I visited that day was about 20 minutes farther north, and I was really surprised because it was a HUGE house, and it seemed like people just got up and left. This house was cool but creepy; my favorite room was a safari themed bar and game room, completely stocked and wallpapered with jungle animals like zebras and tigers and elephants. I have never seen anything like it. There was also a large painting of a girl propped up against a wall, and the creepy thing was that the lights on either side of it turned on as you will see in the picture. It made absolutely no sense, so that's about when I left.

After a three hour break, I met up with three more photographer friends for what I thought was going to be a relaxing shoot of whatever we found to shoot outside; however, we ran into a completely unexpected, enormous, graffiti-filled factory. It was so large that there was no way to get through it all in two hours. There was plenty of machinery left, and there were many climbing opportunities for some different perspectives. So overall, it was a great weekend for shooting, and this week should bring some other fun opportunities as well! 

One last thing. If you are around the Woodstock Square anytime this month, go and check out Ethereal Confection's art display because it's outstanding. Kurt Kreissl, my good friend, is an extremely talented artist. He works mainly with oil and acrylics, but also with graphite. He creates many abstracts and portraits. Traditionally, Kurt's work is very large in size, and there are a few large pieces on display, but many are smaller than usual, and they turned out to be beautiful. There are 17 total pieces hanging, and I will go ahead and post some pictures of his work hanging there, but you should go see it in person because pictures of his work does not do it justice; there are many layers that you can see up close and his attention to detail is amazing. Plus, as most of you know, Ethereal is an amazing place to visit anyway!